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  1. Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Oxford–astrazeneca_covid-19_vaccine

    The Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, codenamed AZD1222, [5] and sold under the brand names Covishield [19] and Vaxzevria [1] [20] among others, is a viral vector vaccine for prevention of COVID-19.Developed in the United Kingdom by the ...

    • Vaxzevria, Covishield
    • Viral vector
  2. European Commission–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine dispute - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › European_Commission–AstraZeneca
    • Background
    • January Dispute
    • March Export Blocks and Halting of Vaccinations
    • April Global Restrictions and Legal Dispute
    • External Links

    In anticipation that a successful vaccine against COVID-19 would be developed, various countries pre-ordered doses of vaccine from the organisations doing research. The United Kingdom pre-ordered 100 million doses of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine candidate by May 2020, through AstraZeneca UK Limited. While in parallel offering UK taxpayer-funded grants to vaccine manufacturers, in the UK and EU, to increase capacity, including approximately £21 million of UK funding for the Halix plant in the Netherlands, according to a report in the Daily Telegraph. in advance of the clinical trials of the Oxford vaccine candidate. The EU denied that the Halix plant had received any UK government funding. The US Government, and WHO COVAX programme placed similar conditional pre-orders, for 600 million doses of the Oxford vaccine candidate, in the following weeks, with the US administration offering $1.2 bn in funding for development, and clinical trials of the candidate. The EU made a 336...

    In the third week of January 2021, AstraZeneca announced that problems at the Belgian plant where it produced the vaccine would reduce the supply available to the European Union from the 80 million doses expected by the end of March, to 31 million doses. This news came at a time when Pfizer had also reduced the output of its vaccine to allow for an upgrade of its facilities. This left the European Union with a shortfall on its requirements. On 25 January, Stella Kyriakides, Europe's health commissioner, stated that discussions were taking place with AstraZeneca, but that the company had not given satisfactory answers as to which doses had been manufactured and to whom they had been delivered. The company responded by stating that its contract with the United Kingdom gave that nation the first claim to vaccines produced domestically, whereas its contract with the European Union only required it to make its "best reasonable efforts" to deliver the doses on time. The contract with the...

    Demand and deliveries

    By the beginning of March, rollout of the vaccination programme in the EU had been fraught with difficulties, especially with regard to the AstraZeneca vaccine. Reports of side effects in health workers receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine led to bad publicity in Germany. By 18 March public confidence in the vaccine in EU member nations fell dramatically, with a YouGov survey finding 55% of Germans and 61% of French people regarding the AstraZeneca vaccine as unsafe. The confidence in other vacc...

    Safety issues

    In mid-March, national medical regulators of thirteen member states of the EU, including Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Latvia and Lithuania, joined several other countries around the world and suspended using the AstraZeneca vaccine after reports of blood clots in some recipients. For example, by the end of March Germany reported 31 cases of very rare Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, primarily in under 55s, after 2.7 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine had been administered, an...

    Allegations of unused stockpiles and response

    These reports of dangerous blood clots led to large falls in public confidence in the vaccine across the EU; in France some 61% of the population believed the AstraZeneca vaccine was unsafe, an increase of 18% from before the row. Similar decreases in confidence were seen in Italy and Spain. This contrasted with the UK where confidence in the vaccine remained high, with just 9% believing it unsafe, a rise of 4%. The British Medical Journal reported that the effects of the row over safety were...

    On 7 April, following further review of the data, the EMA concluded that unusual blood clots with low blood platelets should be listed as very rare side effects of the AstraZeneca vaccine. EMA recommended that EU member states should take into account their pandemic situation and vaccine availability in their decisions on the further use of the AstraZeneca vaccine National regulators, such as Germany's Paul Ehrlich Institute had previously come to the same conclusion after the AstraZeneca rollout continued.Germany had stopped administering the vaccine to under 60s by 31 March. On 8 April, the UK health minister Matt Hancock advised that people aged between 18 and 29 should be offered a different vaccine, stating that the UK had more than enough alternatives. In total, the UK has ordered 40 million doses of the Pfizer-Biontech vaccine and 17 million of the Moderna jab, the two brands approved at the time (enough for up to 28.5 m people). Several EU member states had also restricted t...

    Covid-19 vaccine tracker, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control(account of doses delivered to, and administered in, individual EEA countries, broken down by brand and updated on a dail...

  3. COVID-19 vaccination in Taiwan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › COVID-19_vaccination_in_Taiwan

    COVID-19 vaccination in Taiwan is an ongoing immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country.Following the approval of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 ...

  4. COVID-19 vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Covid-19_vaccine

    A COVID‑19 vaccine is a vaccine intended to provide acquired immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‑CoV‑2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19).Prior to the COVID‑19 pandemic, an established ...

  5. List of COVID-19 vaccine authorizations - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_COVID-19_vaccine_authorizations

    National regulatory authorities have granted emergency use authorizations for twenty-four COVID-19 vaccines.Six of those have been approved for emergency or full use by at least one WHO-recognized stringent regulatory authority ...

  6. Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pfizer–BioNTech_COVID-19_vaccine

    e. The Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine ( INN: tozinameran ), sold under the brand name Comirnaty, is an mRNA -based COVID-19 vaccine developed by the German biotechnology company BioNTech and for its development collaborated with American ...

  7. Walvax COVID-19 vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Walvax_COVID-19_vaccine

    Walvax COVID-19 vaccine. ARCoV, also known as the Walvax COVID-19 vaccine, is an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine candidate developed by Walvax Biotechnology, Suzhou Abogen Biosciences, and the PLA Academy of Military Science. It is approved for Phase III ...

  8. Moderna COVID-19 vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Moderna_COVID-19_vaccine

    Medical uses The Moderna COVID‑19 vaccine is used to provide protection against infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus in order to prevent COVID‑19. The vaccine is given by intramuscular injection into the deltoid muscle. The initial course consists ...

  9. Vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Vaccine

    t. e. A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular infectious disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed ...

  10. COVID-19 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Covid-19

    The disease is mainly transmitted via the respiratory route when people inhale droplets and small airborne particles (that form an aerosol) that infected people breath out as they breathe, talk, cough, sneeze, or sing.[49] [50] [51] Infected ...

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