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  1. Hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertension

    Hypertension with certain specific additional signs and symptoms may suggest secondary hypertension, i.e. hypertension due to an identifiable cause. For example, Cushing's syndrome frequently causes truncal obesity, glucose intolerance, moon ...

    • Usually lifestyle and genetic factors
    • None
    • 9.4 million / 18% (2010)
    • Lifestyle changes, medications
  2. Pulmonary hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulmonary_hypertension

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH or PHTN) is a condition of increased blood pressure within the arteries of the lungs. Symptoms include shortness of breath, syncope, tiredness, chest pain, swelling of the legs, and a fast heartbeat. The condition may ...

  3. Management of hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Management_of_hypertension

    Hypertension is managed using lifestyle modification and antihypertensive medications. Hypertension is usually treated to achieve a blood pressure of below 140/90 mmHg to 160/100 mmHg. According to one 2003 review, reduction of the blood ...

  4. Essential hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_hypertension

    Essential hypertension (also called idiopathic hypertension) is the form of hypertension that by definition has no identifiable cause. It is the most common type affecting 95% of those with high blood pressure.[1][2][3][4] It tends to be ...

    • Primary hypertension
  5. Complications of hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complications_of_hypertension

    Hypertension is an important risk factor for brain infarction and hemorrhage. Approximately 85% of strokes are due to infarction and the remainder are due to hemorrhage, either intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence ...

  6. Labile hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labile_hypertension

    Labile hypertension occurs when there are unexpected changes in blood pressure.The term can be used to describe when people have blood pressure measurements that abruptly fluctuates from being abnormally high, approximately 130/80mm Hg or over ...

  7. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiopathic_intracranial_hypertension

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), previously known as pseudotumor cerebri and benign intracranial hypertension, is a condition characterized by increased intracranial pressure (pressure around the brain) without a detectable cause. The ...

  8. Portal hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal_hypertension

    Portal hypertension is hypertension (high blood pressure) in the hepatic portal system – made up of the portal vein and its branches, that drain from most of the intestine to the liver.Portal hypertension is defined as a hepatic venous pressure ...

  9. Gestational hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestational_hypertension

    Gestational hypertension in the early stages of pregnancy (trimester 1) has been shown to improve the health of the child both in its first year of life, and its later life. However, when the disease develops later in the pregnancy (subsequent ...

  10. Category:Hypertension - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Hypertension

    Pages in category "Hypertension" The following 46 pages are in this category, out of 46 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().This page was last edited on 25 January 2020, at 14:49 (UTC). Text is available under the ...