Yahoo奇摩 網頁搜尋

搜尋結果

  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › GoldGold - Wikipedia

    Gold is a chemical element; it has the symbol Au (from the Latin word "aurum") and the atomic number 79. In its pure form, it is a bright, slightly orange-yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal, a group 11 element, and one of the noble metals. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements ...

    • Metallic yellow
    • COMEX
  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Golden_ratioGolden ratio - Wikipedia

    The golden ratio's negative −φ and reciprocal φ−1 are the two roots of the quadratic polynomial x2 + x − 1. The golden ratio is also an algebraic number and even an algebraic integer. It has minimal polynomial. This quadratic polynomial has two roots, and. The golden ratio is also closely related to the polynomial.

    • 1.10011110001101110111...
    • 1.9E3779B97F4A7C15...
    • 1.618033988749894...
  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MoneyMoney - Wikipedia

    • Etymology
    • History
    • Functions
    • Properties
    • Money Supply
    • Types
    • Monetary Policy
    • Locality
    • Financial Crimes
    • Further Reading

    The word money derives from the Latin word moneta with the meaning "coin" via French monnaie. The Latin word is believed to originate from a temple of Juno, on Capitoline, one of Rome's seven hills. In the ancient world, Juno was often associated with money. The temple of Juno Moneta at Rome was the place where the mint of Ancient Rome was located....

    The use of barter-like methods may date back to at least 100,000 years ago, though there is no evidence of a society or economy that relied primarily on barter. Instead, non-monetary societies operated largely along the principles of gift economy and debt.When barter did in fact occur, it was usually between either complete strangers or potential e...

    In Money and the Mechanism of Exchange (1875), William Stanley Jevons famously analyzed money in terms of four functions: a medium of exchange, a common measure of value (or unit of account), a standard of value (or standard of deferred payment), and a store of value. By 1919, Jevons's four functions of money were summarized in the couplet: 1. Mone...

    The functions of money are that it is a medium of exchange, a unit of account, and a store of value.To fulfill these various functions, money must be: 1. Fungible: its individual units must be capable of mutual substitution (i.e., interchangeability). 2. Durable: able to withstand repeated use. 3. Divisible: divisible to small units. 4. Portable: e...

    In economics, money is any financial instrument that can fulfill the functions of money (detailed above). These financial instruments together are collectively referred to as the money supply of an economy. In other words, the money supply is the number of financial instruments within a specific economy available for purchasing goods or services. S...

    Commodity

    Many items have been used as commodity money such as naturally scarce precious metals, conch shells, barley, beads, etc., as well as many other things that are thought of as having value. Commodity money value comes from the commodity out of which it is made. The commodity itself constitutes the money, and the money is the commodity. Examples of commodities that have been used as mediums of exchange include gold, silver, copper, rice, Wampum, salt, peppercorns, large stones, decorated belts,...

    Representative

    In 1875, the British economist William Stanley Jevons described the money used at the time as "representative money". Representative money is money that consists of token coins, paper moneyor other physical tokens such as certificates, that can be reliably exchanged for a fixed quantity of a commodity such as gold or silver. The value of representative money stands in direct and fixed relation to the commodity that backs it, while not itself being composed of that commodity.

    Fiat

    Fiat money or fiat currency is money whose value is not derived from any intrinsic value or guarantee that it can be converted into a valuable commodity (such as gold). Instead, it has value only by government order (fiat). Usually, the government declares the fiat currency (typically notes and coins from a central bank, such as the Federal Reserve System in the U.S.) to be legal tender, making it unlawful not to accept the fiat currency as a means of repayment for all debts, public and priva...

    When gold and silver were used as money, the money supply could grow only if the supply of these metals was increased by mining. This rate of increase would accelerate during periods of gold rushes and discoveries, such as when Columbus traveled to the New World and brought back gold and silver to Spain, or when gold was discovered in California in...

    The definition of money says it is money only "in a particular country or socio-economic context". In general, communities only use a single measure of value, which can be identified in the prices of goods listed for sale. There might be multiple media of exchange, which can be observed by what is given to purchase goods ("medium of exchange"), etc...

    Counterfeiting

    Counterfeit money is imitation currency produced without the legal sanction of the state or government. Producing or using counterfeit money is a form of fraud or forgery. Counterfeiting is almost as old as money itself. Plated copies (known as Fourrées) have been found of Lydian coins which are thought to be among the first western coins. Historically, objects that were difficult to counterfeit (e.g. shells, rare stones, precious metals) were often chosen as money. Before the introduction of...

    Money laundering

    Money laundering is the process in which the proceeds of crime are transformed into ostensibly legitimate money or other assets. However, in several legal and regulatory systems the term money laundering has become conflated with other forms of financial crime, and sometimes used more generally to include misuse of the financial system (involving things such as securities, digital currencies, credit cards, and traditional currency), including terrorism financing, tax evasion, and evading of i...

    Chown, John F. A History of Money: from AD 800(Psychology Press, 1994).
    Davies, Glyn, and Duncan Connors. A History of Money (4th ed. U of Wales Press, 2016) excerpt.
    Ferguson, Niall. The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World (2009) excerpt
    Keen, Steve (February 2015). "What Is Money and How Is It Created?" argues, "Banks create money by issuing a loan to a borrower; they record the loan as an asset, and the money they deposit in the...
  4. Wikipedia is written by volunteer editors and hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other volunteer projects : Commons. Free media repository. MediaWiki. Wiki software development. Meta-Wiki. Wikimedia project coordination. Wikibooks. Free textbooks and manuals.

  5. Taiwan is not a IMF member but it is still listed in the official IMF indices. Note that several leading GDP-per-capita (nominal) jurisdictions may be considered tax havens, and their GDP data subject to material distortion by tax-planning activities. Examples include Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, Ireland and Luxembourg.

  6. according to International Monetary Fund estimates [n 1] [1] Countries by nominal GDP in 2019 [n 2] > $20 trillion. $10–20 trillion. $5–10 trillion. $1–5 trillion. $750 billion – $1 trillion. $500–750 billion. $250–500 billion.

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 00 - Wikipedia

    0 (zero) is a number representing an empty quantity. Adding 0 to any number leaves that number unchanged. In mathematical terminology, 0 is the additive identity of the integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers, as well as other algebraic structures. Multiplying any number by 0 has the result 0, and consequently, division ...