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  1. J.League - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._League

    The J.League (Japanese: Jリーグ, Hepburn: Jē Rīgu), officially Japan Professional Football League (日本プロサッカーリーグ, Nihon Puro Sakkā Rīgu, literally "Japan Pro Soccer League") is Japan's professional football league ...

    • 1992; 29 years ago
    • Japan
  2. Amazon (company) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_(company)

    Amazon.com, Inc. (/ ˈ æ m ə z ɒ n / AM-ə-zon) is an American multinational technology company which focuses on e-commerce, cloud computing, digital streaming, and artificial intelligence.It is one of the Big Five companies in the U.S. ...

    • Cadabra, Inc. (1994–1995)
    • July 5, 1994; 27 years ago, Bellevue, Washington, U.S.
    • 1,298,000 (Dec. 2020), U.S.: 810,000 (Oct. 2020)
    • Jeff Bezos
  3. Singapore - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore

    Singapore (/ ˈ s ɪ ŋ (ɡ) ə p ɔːr / (listen)), officially the Republic of Singapore, is a sovereign island city-state in maritime Southeast Asia.It lies about one degree of latitude (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator, off the ...

  4. Twice - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TWICE

    Twice ( Korean : 트와이스; Japanese: トゥワイス ), commonly stylized as TWICE, is a South Korean girl group formed by JYP Entertainment. The group is composed of nine members: Nayeon, Jeongyeon, Momo, Sana, Jihyo, Mina, Dahyun, Chaeyoung, and ...

  5. Oak - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak
    • Classification
    • Evolution
    • Hybridization
    • Uses
    • Biodiversity and Ecology
    • Diseases and Pests
    • Conservation
    • Toxicity
    • Cultural Significance
    • Bibliography

    The most recent classification of Quercus divides the genus into two subgenera and eight sections. These divisions support the evolutionary diversification of oaks among two distinct clades: the "Old World" clade, including oaks that diversified mainly in Eurasia; and the "New World" clade, for oaks that diversified mainly in the Americas.

    Records of Quercus have been reported from Late Cretaceous deposits in North America and East Asia, however these are not considered definitive. In a survey of the fossil record of Quercus it was concluded that "pre-Paleogene, and perhaps pre-Eocene occurrences of Quercus macroremains are generally represented by poorly preserved fossils that lack critical features needed for certain identification and need to be treated with caution." The oldest unequivocal records of Quercusdate to the Eocene, around 45 million years ago.

    Interspecific hybridization is quite common among oaks, but usually between species within the same section only, and most common in the white oak group. White oaks are unable to discriminate against pollination by other species in the same section. Because they are wind pollinated and they have weak internal barriers to hybridization, hybridization produces functional seeds and fertile hybrid offspring.Ecological stresses, especially near habitat margins, can also cause a breakdown of mate recognition as well as a reduction of male function (pollen quantity and quality) in one parent species. Frequent hybridization among oaks has consequences for oak populations around the world; most notably, hybridization has produced large populations of hybrids with copious amounts of introgression, and the evolution of new species. Frequent hybridization and high levels of introgression have caused different species in the same populations to share up to 50% of their genetic information. Havin...

    Oak wood has a density of about 0.75 g/cm3 (0.43 oz/cu in) creating great strength and hardness. The wood is very resistant to insect and fungal attack because of its high tannin content. It also has very appealing grain markings, particularly when quartersawn. Oak planking was common on high status Viking longships in the 9th and 10th centuries. The wood was hewn from green logs, by axe and wedge, to produce radial planks, similar to quarter-sawn timber. Wide, quarter-sawn boards of oak have been prized since the Middle Ages for use in interior panelling of prestigious buildings such as the debating chamber of the House of Commons in London and in the construction of fine furniture. Oak wood, from Quercus robur and Quercus petraea, was used in Europe for the construction of ships, especially naval men of war, until the 19th century, and was the principal timber used in the construction of European timber-framed buildings. Today oak wood is still commonly used for furnituremaking an...

    Oaks are keystone species in a wide range of habitats from Mediterranean semi-desert to subtropical rainforest. For example, oak trees are important components of hardwood forests, and certain species are particularly known to grow in associations with members of the Ericaceae in oak–heath forests. A number of kinds of truffles, including the two well known varieties, the black Périgord truffle and the white Piedmont truffle, have symbiotic relationships with oak trees. Similarly many other mushrooms such as Ramaria flavosaponaria also associate with oaks. The European pied flycatcheris an example of an animal species that often depends upon oak trees. Many species of oaks are under threat of extinction in the wild, largely due to land use changes, livestock grazing and unsustainable harvesting. For example, over the past 200 years, large areas of oak forest in the highlands of Mexico, Central America and the northern Andes have been cleared for coffee plantations and cattle ranchin...

    Sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum) is a water mould that can kill oaks within just a few weeks. Oak wilt, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum is also a lethal disease of some oaks, particularly the red oaks (the white oaks can be infected but generally live longer). Other dangers include wood-boring beetles, as well as root rot in older trees which may not be apparent on the outside, often being discovered only when the trees come down in a strong gale. Oak apples are galls on oaks made by the gall wasp. The female kermes scale causes galls to grow on kermes oak. Oaks are used as food plants by the larvae of Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species such as the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, which can defoliate oak and other broadleaved tree species in North America. A considerable number of galls are found on oak leaves, buds, flowers, roots, etc. Examples are oak artichoke gall, oak marble gall, oak apple gall, knopper gall, and spangle gall. A number of species of fun...

    According to a comprehensive report by The Morton Arboretumand the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) an estimated 31% of the world's estimated 430 oak species are threatened with extinction, while the study found an estimated 41% of oak species to be of conservation concern. The countries with the highest numbers of threatened oak species according to the report are China with 36 species, Mexico with 32 species, Vietnam with 20 species and the USA with 16 species. While the cause of decline is still partly unknown for some species, the main causes the scientists determined were climate change and invasive pests in the US, and deforestation and urbanizationin Asia. In the Himalayan region of India, oak forests are being invaded by pine forests due to the increase in temperature. The associated species of pine forest may cross frontiers and become new elements of the oak forests. In eastern North America, rare species of oak trees include scarlet oak (Quercus cocci...

    The leaves and acorns of the oak tree are poisonous in large amounts to livestock including cattle, horses, sheep, and goats due to the toxin tannic acid, causing kidney damage and gastroenteritis. Symptoms of poisoning include lack of appetite, depression, constipation, diarrhea (which may contain blood), blood in urine, and colic. The exception is the domestic pig, which may be fed entirely on acorns in the right conditions, and has traditionally been pastured in oak woodlands (such as the Spanish dehesa and the English system of pannage). Acorns are also edible by humans, after leachingof the tannins.

    National symbol

    The oak is a common symbol of strength and endurance and has been chosen as the national tree of many countries. In England, oaks have been a national symbol since at least the sixteenth century, often used by Shakespeare to convey heritage and power. In England today they remain a symbol of the nation's history, traditions, and the beauty of its countryside. Already an ancient Germanic symbol (in the form of the Donar Oak, for instance), certainly since the early nineteenth century, it stand...

    Religious

    The prehistoric Indo-Europeantribes worshiped the oak and connected it with a thunder or lightning god, and this tradition descended to many classical cultures. In Greek mythology, the oak is the tree sacred to Zeus, king of the gods. In Zeus's oracle in Dodona, Epirus, the sacred oak was the centerpiece of the precinct, and the priests would divine the pronouncements of the god by interpreting the rustling of the oak's leaves. In Celtic polytheism, the name of the oak tree was part of the Pr...

    Historical

    Several oak trees, such as the Royal Oak in Britain and the Charter Oakin the United States, are of great historical or cultural importance. "The Proscribed Royalist, 1651", a famous painting by John Everett Millais, depicted a Royalist fleeing from Cromwell's forces and hidden in an oak. Millais painted the picture in Hayes, Kent, from a local oak tree that became known as the Millais Oak. Approximately 50 km west of Toronto, Canada is the town of Oakville, Ontario, famous for its history as...

    Byfield, Liz (1990) An Oak Tree, Collins book bus, London : Collins Educational, ISBN 0-00-313526-8
    Philips, Roger. Trees of North America and Europe, Random House, Inc., New York ISBN 0-394-50259-0, 1979.
    Logan, William B. (2005) Oak: The Frame of Civilization, New York; London : W.W. Norton, ISBN 0-393-04773-3
    Paterson, R.T. (1993) Use of Trees by Livestock, 5: Quercus, Chatham : Natural Resources Institute, ISBN 0-85954-365-X
  6. GoPro - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GoPro
    • History
    • Product Lines
    • Products
    • Microphone Support
    • See Also
    • External Links

    The company was founded by Nick Woodman in 2002. He was motivated by a 2002 surfing trip to Australia in which he was hoping to capture high quality action photos, but could not because amateur photographers could not get close enough or buy appropriate quality equipment at reasonable prices. The 'GoPro' name came about as Woodman and his surfing friends all aspired to become professional surfers as 'going pro' was the ultimate goal and the only way to be filmed on the water at that time.The camera range was branded 'Hero' as their aim was to capture close-up action shots that made the subject look like a hero. Woodman raised a portion of his initial capital by selling bead and shell belts for under US$20 from his VW vanand, later, fashionable camera straps. He also received over $230,000 from his parents to invest in the business. In 2004, the company sold its first camera system, which used 35 mm film. Digital still and video cameras were later introduced. As of 2014[update], a fi...

    HERO cameras

    Woodman worked on his first camera for two years after founding the company, eventually introducing the GoPro 35mm HERO in September 2004 at San Diego's Action Sports Retailer trade show. In its first year GoPro sold $150,000 worth of products.In 2006 the company introduced its first Digital HERO, with 10 second video capability, and generated $800,000 in revenue. The following year GoPro sales quadrupled to $3.4 million. In 2014, the company was selling the HERO3+ in editions of different co...

    GoPro KARMA & GoPro KARMA Grip

    The GoPro Karma was GoPro's consumer drone, until its discontinuation in January 2018. In 2014, GoPro entered into discussions with DJI for a private label model built with the GoPro branding. After the failure of these negotiations, GoPro entered into an agreement with 3D Robotics(3DR) for a similar partnership based on 3DR's flight controllers. 3DR failed to meet their agreed upon timelines. As a result, GoPro took full control of the development process in mid-2015. Scheduled to be release...

    GoPro 360° Cameras

    In November 2017, GoPro launched the Fusion camera, an omnidirectional camera which is capable of recording 360-degree footage. The Fusion was the first GoPro to feature an increased maximum resolution of 5.8K.In October 2019, GoPro updated this line-up with the introduction of the GoPro MAX.

    The GoPro was originally designed for surfing and capturing pro camera angles, hence the name.If you want to bring it back to the original use, just know that a waterproof-housed GoPro on its own does not float.

    The following cameras have official external microphone support: 1. HERO 9 2. HERO 8 3. HERO7 Black 4. HERO6 Black 5. HERO5 Black 6. HERO5 Session 7. HERO4 Black 8. HERO3+ 9. HERO3 The following cameras lack official support for an external microphone: 1. HERO (2018) 2. HERO (2014) 3. HERO+ 4. HERO+LCD 5. HERO4 Session Cameras up to and including the HERO 4 series can use a simple 3.5mm to Mini-USB adapter to connect external microphones and other audio sources. Starting with the HERO 5 Black, the digital-to-analogue converter is no longer part of the camera itself, and instead relies on an external USB-C Audio Adapter manufactured and sold by GoPro. Although simpler models exist, they do not trigger the required menu item in the camera to enable external sources, and hence do not provide an audio signal. The adapter provides an option to connect audio and power simultaneously. While the adapter still works with HERO 8 cameras, the battery door needs to be removed to expose the USB-...

  7. Copyright - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright
    • History
    • Obtaining Protection
    • Enforcement
    • Rights Granted
    • Limitations and Exceptions
    • Transfer, Assignment and Licensing
    • Criticism
    • Public Domain
    • External Links

    Background

    The concept of copyright developed after the printing press came into use in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. The printing press made it much cheaper to produce works, but as there was initially no copyright law, anyone could buy or rent a press and print any text. Popular new works were immediately re-setand re-published by competitors, so printers needed a constant stream of new material. Fees paid to authors for new works were high, and significantly supplemented the incomes of many...

    Conception

    The concept of copyright first developed in England. In reaction to the printing of "scandalous books and pamphlets", the English Parliament passed the Licensing of the Press Act 1662, which required all intended publications to be registered with the government-approved Stationers' Company, giving the Stationers the right to regulate what material could be printed. The Statute of Anne, enacted in 1710 in England and Scotland provided the first legislation to protect copyrights (but not autho...

    National copyrights

    Often seen as the first real copyright law, the 1709 British Statute of Anne gave the publishers rights for a fixed period, after which the copyright expired.The act also alluded to individual rights of the artist. It began, "Whereas Printers, Booksellers, and other Persons, have of late frequently taken the Liberty of Printing ... Books, and other Writings, without the Consent of the Authors ... to their very great Detriment, and too often to the Ruin of them and their Families:".A right to...

    Ownership

    The original holder of the copyright may be the employer of the author rather than the author himself if the work is a "work for hire". For example, in English law the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 provides that if a copyrighted work is made by an employee in the course of that employment, the copyright is automatically owned by the employer which would be a "Work for Hire". Typically, the first owner of a copyright is the person who created the work i.e. the author. But when more t...

    Eligible works

    Copyright may apply to a wide range of creative, intellectual, or artistic forms, or "works". Specifics vary by jurisdiction, but these can include poems, theses, fictional characters, plays and other literary works, motion pictures, choreography, musical compositions, sound recordings, paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs, computer software, radio and television broadcasts, and industrial designs. Graphic designsand industrial designs may have separate or overlapping laws applied to...

    Originality

    Typically, a work must meet minimal standards of originality in order to qualify for copyright, and the copyright expires after a set period of time (some jurisdictions may allow this to be extended). Different countries impose different tests, although generally the requirements are low; in the United Kingdom there has to be some "skill, labour, and judgment" that has gone into it. In Australia and the United Kingdom it has been held that a single word is insufficient to comprise a copyright...

    Copyrights are generally enforced by the holder in a civil law court, but there are also criminal infringement statutes in some jurisdictions. While central registries are kept in some countries which aid in proving claims of ownership, registering does not necessarily prove ownership, nor does the fact of copying (even without permission) necessarily prove that copyright was infringed. Criminal sanctions are generally aimed at serious counterfeiting activity, but are now becoming more commonplace as copyright collectives such as the RIAA are increasingly targeting the file sharing home Internet user. Thus far, however, most such cases against file sharers have been settled out of court. (See: Legal aspects of file sharing) In most jurisdictions the copyright holder must bear the cost of enforcing copyright. This will usually involve engaging legal representation, administrative or court costs. In light of this, many copyright disputes are settled by a direct approach to the infring...

    According to World Intellectual Property Organisation, copyright protects two types of rights. Economic rights allow right owners to derive financial reward from the use of their works by others. Moral rights allow authors and creators to take certain actions to preserve and protect their link with their work. The author or creator may be the owner of the economic rights or those rights may be transferred to one or more copyright owners. Many countries do not allow the transfer of moral rights.

    In many jurisdictions, copyright law makes exceptions to these restrictions when the work is copied for the purpose of commentary or other related uses. United States copyright law does not cover names, titles, short phrases or listings (such as ingredients, recipes, labels, or formulas). However, there are protections available for those areas copyright does not cover, such as trademarks and patents.

    A copyright, or aspects of it (e.g. reproduction alone, all but moral rights), may be assigned or transferred from one party to another. For example, a musician who records an album will often sign an agreement with a record company in which the musician agrees to transfer all copyright in the recordings in exchange for royalties and other considerations. The creator (and original copyright holder) benefits, or expects to, from production and marketing capabilities far beyond those of the author. In the digital age of music, music may be copied and distributed at minimal cost through the Internet; however, the record industryattempts to provide promotion and marketing for the artist and their work so it can reach a much larger audience. A copyright holder need not transfer all rights completely, though many publishers will insist. Some of the rights may be transferred, or else the copyright holder may grant another party a non-exclusive license to copy or distribute the work in a pa...

    Some sources are critical of particular aspects of the copyright system. This is known as a debate over copynorms. Particularly to the background of uploading content to internet platforms and the digital exchange of original work, there is discussion about the copyright aspects of downloading and streaming, the copyright aspects of hyperlinking and framing. Concerns are often couched in the language of digital rights, digital freedom, database rights, open data or censorship. Discussions include Free Culture, a 2004 book by Lawrence Lessig. Lessig coined the term permission culture to describe a worst-case system. Good Copy Bad Copy (documentary) and RiP!: A Remix Manifesto, discuss copyright. Some suggest an alternative compensation system. In Europe consumers are acting up against the raising costs of music, film and books, and as a result Pirate Parties have been created. Some groups reject copyright altogether, taking an anti-copyright stance. The perceived inability to enforce...

    Copyright, like other intellectual property rights, is subject to a statutorily determined term. Once the term of a copyright has expired, the formerly copyrighted work enters the public domain and may be used or exploited by anyone without obtaining permission, and normally without payment. However, in paying public domain regimes the user may still have to pay royalties to the state or to an authors' association. Courts in common law countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, have rejected the doctrine of a common law copyright. Public domain works should not be confused with works that are publicly available. Works posted in the internet, for example, are publicly available, but are not generally in the public domain. Copying such works may therefore violate the author's copyright.

    Moraes, Frank (2 October 2020). "Copyright Law In 2020 Explained In One Page". WhoIsHostingThis.com.A simplified guide.
    Copyright at Curlie
    WIPOLex from WIPO; global database of treaties and statutes relating to intellectual property
  8. Light-emitting diode - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode

    Working principle Electroluminescence Invented H. J. Round (1907) Oleg Losev (1927) James R. Biard (1961) Nick Holonyak (1962) First production October 1962 Pin configuration A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor light source that ...

  9. MediaTek - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MediaTek
    • Corporate History
    • Acquisitions
    • Financial Performance
    • Product Announcements
    • Controversy
    • Product List
    • See Also
    • External Links

    MediaTek was originally a unit of the Taiwanese firm, United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC), tasked with designing chipsets for home entertainment products. On May 28, 1997, the unit was spun off and incorporated. MediaTek Inc. was listed on the Taiwan Stock Exchange(TSEC) under the "2454" code on July 23, 2001. The company started out designing chipsets for optical drives and subsequently expanded into chips for DVD players, digital TVs, mobile phones, smartphones and tablets.In general MediaTek has had a strong record of gaining market share and displacing competitors after entering new markets. The company launched a division to design products for mobile devices in 2004. Seven years later, it was taking orders for more than 500 million mobile system-on-chip units per annum, which included products for both feature phones and smart devices.By providing extensive system engineering assistance the company allowed many smaller companies and new entrants to enter a mobile phone m...

    In 2005, MediaTek acquired Inprocomm, a wireless semiconductor design company producing 802.11a, b and a/g chips. On September 10, 2007, MediaTek announced its intention to buy Analog Devices cellular radio and baseband chipset divisions for US$350 million.The acquisition was finalised by January 11, 2008. On May 5, 2011, MediaTek acquired Ralink Technology Corporation, gaining products and expertise for Wi-Fi technology for mobile and non-mobile applications, as well as for wired DSL and Ethernetconnectivity. On April 11, 2012, MediaTek acquired Coresonic, a global producer of digital signal processing products based in Linköping, Sweden. Coresonic became a wholly owned subsidiary of MediaTek in Europe. On June 22, 2012, MediaTek announced it would acquire rival Taiwanese chipset designer MStar Semiconductor Inc., which held a strong market share position in digital television chips. The initial phase of the deal saw MediaTek taking a 48 percent stake, with an option to purchase th...

    MediaTek's financial results have been subject to variation as the financial success of different product lines fluctuated. MediaTek's relatively strong sales in 2009/2010 was based on its strong market position for feature phone chipsets. Smartphone and tablet products contributed to MediaTek's sales and income increase in 2013, while revenue recognition from the acquisition of MStar Semiconductor, which became effective in February 2014, as well as a continuing strong position for smartphone and tablet solutions, were the main reasons for the sales growth seen in 2014.In 2014 smartphone chips accounted for approximately 50–55% of revenue, followed by digital home products (25–30%, includes digital television chips), tablet chips (5–10%), feature phone chips (5–10%) and Wi-Fi products (5–10%). MediaTek started shipping chips with integrated 4G LTE baseband in volume in the second half of 2014, later than its largest competitor Qualcomm. The additional cost of the separate baseband...

    The MT8135 system-on-chip (SoC) for tablets announced in July, 2013 was the industry's first chip to implement the new ARM big.LITTLE technology for heterogeneous multi-processing. A variant of the MT8135 was used by Amazon in its Kindle Fire HD tablet models. Also on November 20, 2013, MediaTek launched the MT6592 SoC, the first system-on-chip (SoC) with eight CPU cores which could be used simultaneously,in contrast to competing SoCs with eight physical cores of which only a subset could be active at any given time. The "True Octa-Core" trademark was registered to emphasize the difference in marketing materials. On January 7, 2014, MediaTek announced the development of the world's first "multimode receiver" for wireless charging. In contrast to existing implementations it is compatible with both inductive and resonant charging. The resulting MT3188 wireless charging chip, certified by both the Power Matters Alliance and the Wireless Power Consortiumwas announced on February 24, 201...

    Benchmark cheating

    On April 8, 2020, MediaTek published a post titled "Why MediaTek Stands Behind Our Benchmarking Practices", and later that day AnandTech published an article on MediaTek's Sports Mode. MediaTek said Sports Mode is designed to show full capabilities during benchmarks, that it is standard practice in the industry, and their device makers can choose to enable it or not. AnandTech pointed out Sports Mode was also being applied to benchmarks intended on measuring user experience benchmarks, provid...

    GNSS modules

    Global navigation satellite system(GNSS) modules. 1. MT6628 (GPS) WLAN 802.11b/g/n, WIFI Direct, Bluetooth 4.0 LE, GPS/QZSS, FM 2. MT6620 (GPS) 3. MT3339 (2011) (GPS, QZSS, SBAS) 4. MT3337 (GPS) 5. MT3336 (GPS) 6. MT3333/MT3332 (2013) GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO/BEIDOU/QZSS, is the world's first five-in-one multi-GNSS that supports the Beidou navigation satellite system. 7. MT3329 (GPS) 8. MT3328 (GPS) 9. MT3318 (GPS)

    IEEE 802.11

    As a result of the merger with Ralink, MediaTek has added wireless network interface controllers for IEEE 802.11-standards, and SoCs with MIPSCPUs to its product portfolio. 1. RT3883 includes a MIPS 74KEc CPU and an IEEE 802.11n-conformant WNIC. 2. RT6856 includes a MIPS 34KEc CPU and an IEEE 802.11ac-conformant WNIC.

  10. Soochow University (Taiwan) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soochow_University_(Taiwan)
    • History
    • Publications
    • Excellent Long-Established University Consortium of Taiwan
    • Campus
    • Organization
    • Sports
    • Clubs
    • Traditions
    • Notable Alumni
    • School Presidents

    The original Soochow University was founded by Methodists in Suzhou, Jiangsu, Qing dynastyin 1900 as a merger of three institutions: the Buffington Institute and the Kung Hang School in the city of Soochow (now spelled Suzhou), in Jiangsu Province, and the Anglo-Chinese College in Shanghai. After the Chinese Civil War, members of the Soochow Alumni Association who fled to Taiwan established a new institution there in 1951. A law school was opened in 1954, and a full university was certified in 1971. As a new Soochow Universitywas later founded on the original site in 1982, there would be a Soochow University in Taiwan and a Soochow University in Jiangsu. The campus is home to the tomb of the prominent Chinese politician and diplomat Wang Ch'unghui, who fled to Taiwan after the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949. In 2014, the Japan–Taiwan Exchange Associationlisted Soochow University as one of the seven well-known Taiwanese universities.

    In 1981, the first joint-issued class-made magazine, completely founded by students, called Xu Ai, appeared in Soochow University.[citation needed]Students voiced political opinions as to temporal society, but the magazine was quickly banned by the strong commend of the college. However, the next year, the political students published another critical magazine, Monthly Political Magazine of Soochow University. It was banned, a result from publishing an advertisement of Shen Geng, which was a magazine of the Chinese Nationalist Party control.[citation needed] On 9 September 1982, the Academic Conference of Political Department organized an audit for second year students about Taipei City Council.[citation needed] But the lead teacher Huang Erxuan[citation needed]was charged by leading a group of students to the council to listen the interpolation produced by the outside party senator. He was fired the next year.

    Soochow University is a member of the Excellent Long-Established University Consortium of Taiwan (ELECT),which is an organization devoted to inter-school cooperation and sharing resources between schools. The twelve union universities were all founded over half a century with each of their own strengths covering professional fields of science and technology, commerce, agronomy, medicine, media, law, education, art and design, etc. These schools allow students to have multiple options, cross-domain learning and a broader adaptive development for their education.

    Soochow University in Taiwan has two branches: a downtown branch near the Republic of China (ROC) presidential office in Taipei's Zhongzheng district and the main campus near the National Palace Museum in Taipei's Shilin district. The law and business colleges are in the downtown campus. All other colleges are located in the main campus.

    Taiwan's first private university is headed by a president and a board of trustees. The University is divided into six schools or colleges, each having a variety of departments:

    Sports play an important role in campus life. The downtown campus has tennis and basketball courts. The main campus has indoor and outdoor basketball courts, tennis courts, a race track, a mini rock climbing wall, and a field that is used for softball and soccer. Each year the university holds two major student athletic events. Much of the sports facilities on the main campus are on land owned by the Taipei city government rather than by the university. The city government has considered reclaiming the land to build an expressway but has decided to back off with this project.

    The university has 183 student clubs or societies, such as Association for Diplomacy Research (SCU A.D.R.).

    24-hour International Ultramarathon: Runners from several countries, students, faculty, and celebrities such as Ryoichi Sekiya and Mami Kudoparticipate in this annual event. Only very few of the co...
    Campus Christmas Carol: Students from the music department visit the faculty residential apartment complexes sing Christmas carols on Christmas Eve. Having people singing carols in the neighborhood...
    Chen Chih-ching, Minister of Council of Agriculture(2016)
    Han Kuo-yu, mayor of Kaohsiung
    John Chiang, Vice Chairperson of Kuomintang(2008-2014)
    David L. Anderson[zh](1901–1911)
    John W. Cline (1911–1922)
    Walter B. Nance (1922–1927)
    Yang Yongqing[zh](1927–1949)