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  1. help. " God Save the Queen ", alternatively " God Save the King " (dependent on the gender of the reigning monarch), is the national or royal anthem in most Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown Dependencies. [1] [2] The author of the tune is Muzio Filippo Vincenzo Francesco Saverio Clementi (23 January 1752 – 10 March ...

    • September 1745; 276 years ago
    • Unknown
    • "God Save the King", (when the monarch is male)
    • Seat of State
    • History
    • Rhetorical Usage
    • See Also
    • Notes
    • References

    The dragon was the symbol on the imperial flag and other imperial objects, including the throne or imperial utensil. The dragon was said to have the power to become visible or invisible—in short, the dragon was a factotumin the "divinity business" of the Chinese emperors. The dragon was the crest on royal monuments. The dragon was displayed on the ...

    In Imperial China, the seat of power was called the Dragon's Seat or the Dragon Throne.The process of accession, the ceremonies of enthronement and the act being seated on the Dragon's Throne were roughly interchangeable. The Dragon Throne was an hereditary monarchy in China before 1912. In much the same sense as the British Crown, the Dragon Thron...

    This flexible English term is also a rhetorical trope. Depending on context, the Dragon Throne can be construed as a metonymy, which is a rhetorical device for an allusion relying on proximity or correspondence, as for example referring to actions of the Emperoror as "actions of the Dragon Throne." The Dragon Throne is also understood as a synecdoc...

    This article incorporates text from The Middle kingdom: a survey of the ... Chinese empire and its inhabitants ..., by Samuel Wells Williams, a publication from 1848, now in the public domainin the...
    This article incorporates text from Commercial Handbook of China, by Arnold, Julean Herbert, a publication from 1920, now in the public domainin the United States.
    This article incorporates text from The preceptor's assistant, or, Miscellaneous questions in general history, literature, and science, by Williams, David, a publication from 1858, now in the publi...
    This article incorporates text from China Through the Stereoscope: A Journey Through the Dragon Empire at the Time of the Boxer Uprising, by Ricalton, James, a publication from 1901, now in the pub...
    Arnold, Julean Herbert. (1920). Commercial Handbook of China. Washington, D.C.: United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Government Printing Office. OCLC 3882862
    Bland, John Otway Percy. (1921). China, Japan and Korea. New York: W. Heinemann. OCLC 252248839
    "Chinese Coronation: Coronation of Taou-Kwang, the new Emperor of China," The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany. (East India Company). London: William H. Allen & Co. Vol. 13 (1822 January–June...
    Griffis, William Elliot. (1911). China's Story in Myth, Legend, Art and Annals. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. OCLC 850353
  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Dragon_KingDragon King - Wikipedia

    • Dragon Worship
    • Yellow Dragon
    • Dragon Kings of The Four Seas
    • Worship of The Dragon God
    • Buddhism
    • Artistic Depictions
    • See Also

    The ancient Chinese worship gods of the dragon because the Chinese dragon is an imagined reptile that represents evolution from the ancestors and qi energy. The presence of dragons within Chinese culture dates back several thousands of years with the discovery of a dragon statue dating back to the fifth millennium BC from the Yangshao culture in He...

    The Yellow Dragon (黃龍 Huánglóng) does not have a precise body of water of which he is the patron. However, as the zoomorphic incarnation of the Yellow Emperor, he represents the source of the myriad things.

    Each one of the four Dragon Kings of the Four Seas (四海龍王 Sìhǎi Lóngwáng) is associated to a colour and a body of water corresponding to one of the four cardinal directions and natural boundaries of China: the East Sea (corresponding to the East China Sea), the South Sea (corresponding to the South China Sea), the West Sea (Qinghai Lake), and the No...

    Worship of the Dragon God is celebrated throughout China with sacrifices and processions during the fifth and sixth moons, and especially on the date of his birthday the thirteenth day of the sixth moon. A folk religious movement of associations of good-doing in modern Hebei is primarily devoted to a generic Dragon God whose icon is a tablet with h...

    Some Buddhist traditions describe a figure named Duo-luo-shi-qi or Talasikhin as a Dragon King who lives in a palace located in a pond near the legendary kingdom of Ketumati. It is said that during midnight he used to drizzle in this pond to cleanse himself of dust.

    Longwang in art
    The Dragon King part of a statue representing "Takenouchi no Sukune Meeting the Dragon King of the Sea", dated 1875–1879, Japan.
    Dragon King sculpture with residual traces of pigment, dated 11th–12th century, Japan.
    The Dragon Kings of the Four Seas at the Grand Matsu Temple in Tainan.
  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Druk_GyalpoDruk Gyalpo - Wikipedia

    • Duties and Powers
    • Voluntary and Involuntary Abdication
    • See Also

    The Constitution confirms the institution of monarchy. The Druk Gyalpo (King of Bhutan) is the Head of State and the symbol of unity of the Kingdom and of the people of Bhutan. The Constitution establishes the "Chhoe-sid-nyi" (dual system of religion and politics) of Bhutan as unified in the person of the King who, as a Buddhist, is the upholder of...

    The Constitution provides substantive and procedural law for two paths of abdicationfor reigning monarchs: voluntary and involuntary. As stated above, the King may relinquish the exercise of Royal Prerogatives, and such relinquishment may be temporary. The Constitution provides that the King must abdicate the throne for wilful violations of the Con...

    • History and Performance
    • The New Zealand Expo Song
    • Protocol
    • Copyright
    • Lyrics
    • Criticism
    • External Links

    "God Defend New Zealand" was written as a poem in the 1870s by Irish-born, Victorian-raised immigrant Thomas Bracken of Dunedin. A competition to compose music for the poem was held in 1876 by The Saturday Advertiser and judged by three prominent Melbourne musicians, with a prize of ten guineas. The winner of the competition was the Vandemonian-bor...

    In 1987 Alan Slater produced a new arrangement of the song, having been commissioned to do so by the Department of Internal Affairs, which was used for World Expo 88. It was titled The New Zealand Expo Song and consisted of the first verse in Māori sung by Annie Crummer, the second verse in English sung by Peter Morgan, the fourth verse in Māori su...

    The Ministry for Culture and Heritage has responsibility for the national anthems. The guidelines in the 1977 Gazette notice for choosing which anthem should be used on any occasion advise that "God Save the Queen" would be appropriate at any occasion where the Queen, a member of the royal family, or the governor-general, when within New Zealand, i...

    Copyright on the English lyrics for "God Defend New Zealand" expired from the end of the year that was 50 years after the death of the author (Bracken), that is, from 1 January 1949. The rights to the musical score passed into the public domainin the 1980s.

    The anthem has five verses, each in English and Māori. The Māori version is not a direct translation of the English version. The underlying structure of the piece is a prayer or invocationto God, with the refrain "God defend New Zealand" (in English). Meaning of "Pacific's triple star" There is some discussion, with no official explanation, of the ...

    Both the lyrics and melody of "God Defend New Zealand" have been criticised in some quarters as being dull and irrelevant. Many of the words and concepts have been perceived as antiquated or obscure: for example, "thy", "thee", "ramparts", "assail", and "nations' van". It was perceived as being difficult to sing at the original pitch.However, no wi...

  4. Dragon king theory. Dragon king (DK) is a double metaphor for an event that is both extremely large in size or impact (a "king") and born of unique origins (a "dragon") relative to its peers (other events from the same system). DK events are generated by or correspond to mechanisms such as positive feedback, tipping points, bifurcations, and ...

  5. Released 2001 Recorded June 24, 1973 Venue Left Bank Jazz Society at the Famous Ballroom, Baltimore, MarylandGenre Jazz Length 68: 02 Label Prestige PRCD 11019 Producer God Bless Jug and Sonny is a live album by saxophonists Sonny Stitt and Gene Ammons recorded in Baltimore in 1973 and released on the Prestige label in 2001.

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